The role of middle leaders in driving school improvement is crucial. Despite a wide acceptance of this wisdom across education, acting on it is not. On the 3rd November, I led a workshop on the Independent Schools Qualification in Academic Management (ISQAM)  course on this issue.  Below is a brief outline.

Purpose is a crucial factor when leading people. Without it, decisions can be paralysing. Delegates were asked to consider the notion of ‘purpose’ throughout the session and the importance it plays from a whole-school perspective and from a departmental point of view.

The other major feature of the presentation was to clarify the difference between strategy and development. A colleague in a state school contacted me a while ago for some help with what their Head wanted from them. After a few minutes it was clear that their Head did not know the difference between a strategic plan and a development plan and this led to increased stress on all sides. Simply, strategy is concerned with defining the shape and extent of the organisation. Development is concerned with how the organisation is going to adapt and improve within the strategic framework. To put it another way, strategy is concerned with what ‘B’ looks like and development is concerned with the substantive steps that take us from ‘A’ to ‘B’.

I then discussed the strategic process from a whole-school point of view from four key areas:

  1. Background research – stakeholders, market research, SWOT analysis
  2. Core Aims and Values – what are our core values? What do we stand for? What are we trying to achieve?
  3. Decide Fundamentals – size/structure of the school, boarding/day, single-sex/co-ed
  4. Determine direction – where are we going? Why are going there?

On the background research, I discussed the use of analysing student numbers and the use of Mosaic data to think about potential competitors and prospective parents. This is a fascinating aspect of analysis and if you work in an independent school as a senior leader and have not heard/seen the data, I recommend going on a course to find out more about it.

After going through the rest of the process from a whole-school perspective, we then explored what the process would like from a departmental point of view. I mentioned the importance of the ‘pre-mortem‘ in departmental and school planning and how a ‘multipliers‘ approach can work at a department level.

I was also keen to stress (and I will do so again) that despite using Berkhamsted as the basis for the presentation, we have not got everything right! When I joined the school, the middle leaders (academic and pastoral) were not directly involved in the development process and I felt strongly that they should be. Now, we have two separate development days for HoDs and pastoral leaders in January set aside for this purpose. Their thoughts flow directly into the Senior Leader strategy days later on in the year and shared with the school before the end of the summer term so people can think through departmental development plans carefully.

Detailed information on the workshop can be found below:

The Headmasters’ and Headmistresses’s Conference (HMC) and the Girls’ Schools Association (GSA) jointly run the ISQAM. If you are a current middle leader, or aspire to be one, I highly recommend the course.

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